Tag Archives: Indigenous Literature

Orange Shirt Day: Guiding Conversations about Residential Schools in the Classroom

September 30th is Orange Shirt Day—a nationally-recognized event to acknowledge the harm inflicted by residential schools. For educators, this day represents a special opportunity to engage young people in important discussions about residential schools and other structures of systemic racism.  There’s no way around it; these conversations are hard. They’re painful, delicate—and necessary. So, where […]

Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Books for Teaching Sustainability, Ecology, and the Environment in BC Classrooms

Sustainability is more than a trend; it’s the initiative our world depends on. As our world reels from climate change, our mission must be to place environmentalism at the heart of our culture. Educators like you have the unique opportunity to engender young people with the desire to live sustainably. With that goal in mind, […]

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Authentic Indigenous Content for Middle Years and High School Classrooms

With the new school year just around the corner, we’ve heard from teachers like you looking to include Indigenous perspectives in your curriculum. If you’re looking to incorporate more great literature from Indigenous authors into your classroom, this list is for you. These stories make great reads for older students with powerful touch points for […]

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Authentic Indigenous Content for Early Years Classrooms

As you prepare for another school year, curriculums across Canada are changing to include thoughtful, high-quality Indigenous content. This is a critical shift in Canadian culture, in which you—as an educator—have the power to spark important discussions about where we’ve come from, and where our future may lead. Written by Indigenous authors, these books give […]

Also tagged , , , |

How “The Reckoner” trilogy contributes to TRC

The Reckoner: Even in Fiction, There Is Truth! If you haven’t been following Indigenous teen superhero Cole Harper’s adventures in Wounded Sky First Nation, now is the time to catch up. The third book in David A. Robertson’s The Reckoner trilogy, “Ghosts”, is finally here—and fans will finally learn the fate of Cole’s community. While […]

Also tagged , , , , |

Look, Then Look Again: Remarks on KC Adams’ Perception: A Photo Series

Art has always been a catalyst for social change. It’s one thing to bring awareness to a cause, or appeal for a change to the word of law. It’s quite another to use an artistic medium to dismantle harmful, pervasive stereotypes. In KC Adams’ Perception: A Photo Series, she asks her audience to question their […]

Also tagged , , , , , |

Richard Van Camp on Honouring Frank T’Seleie

Richard Van Camp is the author of “Like a Razor Slash,” a story in the anthology This Place: 150 Years Retold. The story features illustrations by Scott B. Henderson and colour art by Scott A. Ford. In his author statement below, Richard explores how the events of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline served as inspiration for the […]

Also tagged , , , , , |

An Interview with Peter Diamond, Cover Artist for the Reckoner Trilogy

Peter Diamond is a Canadian illustrator who studied Fine Arts at the University of Halifax. He is now based in Vienna, Austria. Besides working freelance with clients around the world in publishing, editorial, and advertising, Peter also teaches drawing at Illuskills and works with the international illustration community through Illustria and the European Illustrators Forum. He […]

Also tagged , , , , , , |

Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm on“Nimkii,” and the History of Indigenous Children in Foster Care

Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm is the author of “Nimkii,” a story in the anthology This Place: 150 Years Retold. The story features illustrations by Ryan Howe and Jen Storm, and colour art by Donovan Yaciuk. In her author statement below, Kateri shares the stories that inspired “Nimkii,” and the personal connection that runs throughout.  * * * * “Nimkii” […]

Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Rachel and Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley on Inuit Shamanism in “Rosie”

Rachel and Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley are the authors of “Rosie,” a story in the anthology This Place: 150 Years Retold. The story features illustrations and colour art by GMB Chomichuck. In their author statement below, Rachel & Sean delve into how colonization affected the Inuit, as well as some of the principles of Inuit shamanism. * […]

Also tagged , , , , , , , |