Your cart is empty.

Dancing With Our Ancestors

By Sara Florence Davidson & Robert Davidson
Illustrated by Janine Gibbons
Categories: Children's Fiction, Indigenous, Multigenerational, Dance, Death & Dying
Series: Sk'ad'a Stories Series
Imprint: HighWater Press

Interest Age: 6–8
Grade: 1–3
Reading Level: Fountas & Pinnell S, Lexile® Framework for Reading: 950L
Hardcover : 9781774920244, 40 pages, September 2022
Ebook (EPUB) : 9781774920251, 40 pages, October 2022
Ebook (PDF) : 9781774920268, 40 pages, October 2022

Learn about the cultural significance of the Haida potlatch through the sights, sounds, and dances of this once-banned ceremony.

Description

In this tender picture book, Sara Florence Davidson transports readers to the excitement of a potlatch in Hydaburg, Alaska—her last memory of dancing with her late brother.

It feels like my brother and I have always known how to sing the songs and dance the dances of our Haida ancestors. Unlike our father, we were born after the laws that banned our cultural practices were changed. The potlatch ban did not exist during our time, so we grew up dancing and singing side by side.

The invitations have been sent. The food has been prepared. The decorations have been hung. And now the day of the potlatch has finally arrived! Guests from all over come to witness this bittersweet but joyful celebration of Haida culture and community.

Written by the creators of Potlatch as Pedagogy, this book brings the Sk'ad'a Principles to life through the art of Janine Gibbons.

Reviews

The colorful, painted illustrations set a festive tone while the text also teaches that there were once laws banning these celebrations. The celebratory book will find a ready home in public library and elementary school library shelves, and anywhere looking to expand picture book knowledge of Indigenous cultures.

Carrie Voliva, School Library Journal

Among Quill & Quire's Fall Preview: Books for Young People – Picture Books

Quill & Quire, Quill & Quire

Each of the four books documents a different day in the authors’ lives, including learning to carve argillite and fishing on the Yakoun River. Along the way, they immerse the reader in an Indigenous approach to teaching and learning. The collection really honours the people in the stories.

Kaitlyn Bailey, Vancouver Sun